Sedona Peace Park Spiritual Renewal and Hiking

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Sedona is famous for its stunning red rocks, pleasant climate, and spiritual vortexes. People from around the world travel to Sedona to enjoy the outdoors, spiritual renewal, and to visit the New Age shops and spas.

For a unique experience in Sedona you’ll want to visit the Peace Park, which features a Buddhist temple and a statue of Buddha.

And hiking trails :)

The Sedona Amitabha Stupa is a sacred place, but you don’t have to be a Buddhist to visit, all are welcome.

One of my friends told me about the Sedona Peace Park and I made a point to visit on my first trip to Sedona.

This post is all about the Sedona Peace Park, spiritual renewal, and hiking.

Sedona Peace Park

Sedona Peace Park

Address: 2650 Pueblo Dr, Sedona AZ

Sedona Stupa and Peace Park is open from 7 am to 6 pm daily and I highly recommend a visit to this tranquil space in the Sedona red rocks.

At the Amitabha Stupa of Sedona you will see a large bronze sculpture of Buddha looking towards the 36 ft tall Stupa. Colorful prayer flags adorn many of the trees in the Peace Park.

The atmosphere is serene and welcoming. There are many hiking trails near the Stupa, such as Chimney Rock and Thunder Mountain trail.

I’m not a religious person but I do yoga and meditate daily.

As soon as I walked the path to the stupa, I felt the positive energy of the Peace Park. It is a place for anyone seeking enlightenment, reflection, or solitude.

Stupa and Buddha Sedona Arizona

Sedona Arizona red rocks

Amitabha Stupa History

The Sedona Amitabha Stupa gets its name from Buddha Amitabha – the Buddha of Limitless Light.

Over a period of 18 months Tulku Sang-nang Rinpoche oversaw the construction of the Amitabha Stupa in Sedona Arizona. Afterwards Rinpoche lead ceremonies at the Amitabha Stupa to create an auspicious environment.

People from around the world visit Sedona for spiritual awakening and the Amitabha Stupa receives thousands of visitors each year.

Year completed: 2004

Height: 36 ft (11 m)

Colorful prayer flags on a tree

Visiting Amitabha Stupa Sedona

There is a parking lot at Amitabha Stupa, but it does get full so it’s best to plan your visit during weekdays when it’s not as busy.

I felt a calming and welcoming vibe at the Sedona Stupa as soon as I started walking the path to the sacred strucure.

There is a covered area with chairs facing the stupa so people can meditate.

When you walk the path around the stupa everyone walks in one direction, clockwise around the temple.

Buddha at Amitabha Stupa and Peace Park

 

Prayer wheels Sedona Arizona

What is a Stupa?

Stupas are the oldest of Buddhist religious monuments. Originally, stupas were made from earth and stones, used to bury the Buddha.

The definition of stupa is a dome shaped structure erected in memory of Buddha. These spiritual structures are places of meditation.

Stupas are rare in the Western world. This makes the Sedona stupa even more special.

Today there are various types of stupas, such as commemorative, object, relic, symbolic, and votive. In Tibetan Buddhism there are eight types of stupas (chortens) to commemorate events in Buddha’s life.

It is traditional to make offerings at a stupa.

The stupa at the Peace Park in Sedona is filled with millions of prayers for peace.

Amitabha Stupa and Peace Park Sedona

5 Famous Stupas Around the World

The Great Stupa at Sanchi in India is the most famous stupa, it is one of the oldest stone structures in India. The location of Sanchi Stupa is on a hilltop of Sanchi in Raisen District, State of Madhya Pradesh, India, about 45 km from Bhopal, the capital of Madhya Pradesh.

Borobudur in Indonesia is the largest Buddhist Temple in the world.

Boudhanath Stupa in Kathmandu Nepal is one of the largest spherical stupas in the world.

Ruwanwelisaya Stupa in Sri Lanka is over 2,100 years old and one of the world’s tallest Buddhist Temples. Built in 140 BCE the structure is hemispherical and features boundary walls with elephant head sculptures.

Phra Pathom Chedi in Thailand is the tallest Buddhist stupa in the world. The stupa is in Nakhon Pathom, central Thailand and is over 417 ft (127 m) tall.

Medicine Wheel Sedona Arizona

Tips for Visiting Sedona Peace Park

Because Sedona stupa is a sacred place there is no smoking allowed, and please be respectful of other visitors to the park. Please avoid loud talking or eating while visiting the park.

Sedona gets hot during summer months so bring water to keep hydrated. A sun hat or scarf and sunscreen are also good items to bring with you to the park.

If you plan on hiking the trails wear comfortable hiking shoes and appropriate clothing for the climate.

Pets are allowed at the Peace Park and Amitabha Stupa but please keep them on leash and clean up after them.

Please do not rearrange any of the rocks on the trails at the park.

Please do not sit, stand, climb, or place objects on the Stupa.

Do not burn incense, candles, smuding, or any type of flammables.

The gate at the street is locked after the park is closed so be sure to exit before closing time.

If you are financially able, please donate as a Friend of the Amitabha Stupa to help support the ongoing legacy of peace.

prayer flags Sedona

I hope you enjoy this unique Sedona experience!

Another cool day trip from Sedona is the Hananki Ruins cliff dwellings and ATV trails.

If you want a great Sedona hike that has lots of shade you must do the West Fork Trail. It follows a beautiful red rock canyon along Oak Creek.

My favorite red rock hike in Sedona is still Little Horse Trail. This one is good for biking or hiking.

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Peace Park Stupa Buddha and Hiking Sedona Arizona

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About the Author

Susan Moore spent 7 months traveling solo around Southeast Asia back in the 90's. Returning to Canada she found a job working on rotation in Siberia Russia. She later moved to Austin Texas where she started a bookkeeping business, allowing her to work remotely. Currently Susan is in year 5 of a solo road trip around the USA and Canada, living a nomadic life, and writing about her experiences with a focus on hiking and cultural encounters. Read all about Susan » You can reach Susan Moore at Facebook or Twitter or Instagram

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